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The Pinball Hall of Fame

Posted by on Jan 18, 2018 in Travel | 0 comments

 

Growing up, I thought it’d be awesome to have an arcade game in my house.

Even though I wasn’t nearly as into video games as my brother, I enjoyed an occasional game of Ms. Pac-Man or Tetris or pinball. When we were waiting for our pizza at my family’s favorite spot, we’d both be bugging our parents for quarters.

I’m not sure where the idea came from that I needed one in my house, but, apparently, I’m not the only one who thought about that.

The majority of people who responded to my Twitter poll also thought that would be cool. I think it was a 70s/80s kid thing. A few people responded they just wanted console games, so I assume they’re a bit younger, growing up when that was a viable alternative.

 

Playing pinball

The Dream of the ’80s is Alive in Vegas

And then there’s Tim Arnold. He took that dream to a whole new level, collecting and repairing pinball machines and vintage arcade games until there were too many to fit into his house.

As his collection grew, his dream became to find a place to fit his hundreds of machines under one roof.

He created the Pinball Hall of Fame in Las Vegas – now located about half a mile from The Strip and across from UNLV. Not only can you visit and see the games, you can play them!

Pinball machine

Fat Stacks (of Quarters)

Phillip and I checked it out when we were in Las Vegas last year. We weren’t sure if they had change machines there (they do), so we showed up ready to go with like $20 in quarters. I’m sure Kid Me would have been jealous of Grown-up Me walking around with all that change in my pocket. There have to be some perks to being adult.

All the Games

There were games we remembered from childhood, newer ones with elaborate digital displays, and older analog ones.

In fact, there were all kinds of quirky old mechanical games that weren’t like anything I’d seen before. Some of them had handwritten signs taped on that told their story or had warnings of how not to break the game.

One looked like a miniature bowling lane, complete with little wooden pins. There was a two-person hockey game. Phillip played “Space Pilot,” which had a little metal spaceship you move up and down with a joystick, as well as one where you make a clown dance. And it appeared to be called “Hey kids, play with Peppy!” Yeah, that’s not creepy at all.

Of course, we played pinball. Lord of the Rings pinball and Indiana Jones pinball and Gilligan’s Island and Atlantis and probably others I’m forgetting. There was this Corvette one that I think my brother used to play at the pizza place.

OUT OF OЯDER

One game I didn’t get to play was Tetris.

When I told a volunteer it wasn’t working, she opened it up and tinkered with it a bit. When it became clear it wouldn’t be a quick fix, she refunded the quarters I had put in the machine and hung an “out of order” sign on it. Oh well.

While the majority of games are in working condition, vintage machines do break down, and it’s getting harder to find replacement parts. Tim Arnold and his team of volunteers get creative, buying busted machines for replacement parts and figuring out ways to make their own when they can’t order them.

 

– More info –

The Pinball Hall of Fame is a not-for-profit, volunteer-run arcade of working (mostly) vintage pinball machines and games like Pac-man, Tetris, and Star Wars.

Where: 1610 E. Tropicana, Las Vegas (North side of Tropicana between Maryland Parkway and Eastern Avenue, about 1.5 mi from The Strip.)

Parking: Free lot on-site.

Hours:

Sunday – Thursday: 11am to 11pm
Friday – Saturday: 11am to 12am

Cost: Free entrance. Games are 25 cents to $1.

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Violet

Posted by on Jan 15, 2018 in Craft, Travel | 5 comments

Berries near piobocco

Since it’s the beginning of a new year, I thought I’d share some art, food, destination, and DIY ideas inspired by Pantone’s color of the year, Ultra Violet!

1. Berries, Le Marche, Italy. 2. Pantone Ultra Violet. 3. Chocolade Van Brugge, Scottsdale (photo: Stephanie Haworth). 4. Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix.

 

Mari Orr art

5. “Victoria” painting by Mari Orr. 6. Photo transfer tutorial. 7. Ed Mell art for Riders of the Purple Sage. (Photo: Tim Trumble).

 

8. Yuma Garden Company’s colorful carrots. 9. Making Chive Flower Vinegar. 10. Lo & Sons O.G. Overnight Bag.

 

Resolution ornament

11. Chaparral sage, Tucson. 12. New Year’s time capsule DIY. 13. Let’s Be Better Humans campaign bus. 14. View from Sunset Point rest area near Black Canyon City, Arizona.

 

Finally, a cake decorated with actual fresh violets….

 

 


Photos via respective sites, except as noted.

 

 

Microblog Mondays: Write in your own space

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MLK Day: Where to Volunteer in Phoenix

Posted by on Jan 10, 2018 in Travel | 0 comments

I was looking to see what kind of service projects were planned in my community for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and I found a bunch at handsonphoenix.org! I’ll share a few you might be interested in below.

 

Step Up

 

You can sign up on the site to volunteer if you’re over 18. Check the individual project for age restrictions and waivers required for younger teens and kids.

If you live outside of the Phoenix area, you can search nationalservice.gov for opportunities in other states.

 

Phoenix

Sort and Pack at St. Mary’s Food Bank

Jan 13, 8-10am
St. Mary’s Food Bank, Phoenix
Sort, pack, and distribute food for other nonprofits and families in crisis at St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance.

  • Feel free to bring donations of cereal, canned goods, bottled water, and/or pet food with you to the project.
  • Due to health codes and safety reasons, a volunteer dress code is in effect. (Closed Toe Shoes, shirts with sleeves, pants, etc.)

 

Garden Volunteers at the Japanese Friendship Garden

Jan 13, 8-11am
Japanese Friendship Garden, Phoenix
Help with either non-technical duties (like cleaning up trash) or technical garden maintenance (like precise pruning of plants).

 

Puppy Pals at Animal Care West Valley Shelter

Jan 13, 9-11am
Maricopa County Animal Care Services, West Valley Shelter, Phoenix
Spend time with adoptable pets. Walk dogs or brush and pet cats.

 

Project Vitamin C with City of Glendale

Jan 13, 9am-12pm
Sahuaro Ranch Park, Glendale
Help pick citrus from the park’s trees to donate to local food banks.

 

MLK 2018: Trailblazing at South Mountain Park

Jan 14, 10:30am-12:30pm
South Mountain Park, Phoenix
Assist with projects, such as tree trimming, maintenance, graffiti removal, trash pick-up, and painting. Details will be emailed to volunteers after sign up. Ages 18+.

 

Vets in Need Outdoor Refresh

Jan 15, 8am-12pm
Avondale
Join volunteers in painting the exterior of the home of a Veteran in need. Training, project supplies, light snacks and water will be provided.

 

Be a good person

MLK Jr. Celebration Parade

Jan 15, 8:30am-12:30pm
Mesa Convention Center (outside) / Downtown Mesa
Help with parade contestant check-in and parade route guidance.

 




Dog photo is of Mulder (ID#A4027230), who’s available for adoption at Maricopa County Animal Care + Control – East Valley Animal Care Center. Copyright ©HLP Inc.

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Love Lock Update

Posted by on Jan 4, 2018 in Travel | 0 comments

After researching how the love lock trend has gone out of control in many European tourist areas, I’m happy to report that we barely saw any locks weighing down bridges or monuments when we were in Italy.

Venice

I was honestly a little worried that the Venice bridges Mark and Dawn Hawk cleared last spring might be covered again. Thankfully, that was not the case.

We only spotted a cluster (or two) of rusty locks near Piazza San Marco (the eye of the Venice tourism hurricane) and a few stray locks on railings here and there.

 

Rome

It was similar in Rome. There would be up to maybe half a dozen on a random piece of a bridge railing or a lamppost.

Locks on bridge in Rome

Maybe it helped that peak tourist season was over. Maybe word is getting out.

 

Sedona

On the other hand, they’re still happily accepting love locks in the Plaza de la Fuente at Sedona’s Tlaquepaque.

We checked it out when we were there in October, and Phillip was impressed with just how heavy a mass of locks can be.

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The Way Trees Grow

Posted by on Jan 1, 2018 in Life, Travel | 3 comments

 

My elementary school art teacher didn’t like my trees.

Tree branches at boyce thompson arboretum

The drawing I had been working on was of a whole forest of them – with trunks that were bent and twisted all different directions.

Palo verdes at arboretum

“Trees grow straight up and down,” she criticized. “Not like that.” She made me start my drawing over.

I remembered this while I was hiking recently.

Bent palm tree

And I wanted to laugh every time I passed yet another example of nature showing that I had been correct all along.

BTA tree

 




Microblog Mondays: Write in your own space

Find more trees over at Happiness and Food’s Tree Love Thursdays!

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